Tag Archives: lose

Lose or Loose?

I’m sure you know the difference in meaning between these two words, but I see the wrong one written so frequently that I thought I might as well harangue you today:

LOSE means to misplace, be deprived of or cease to retain something. It rhymes with FUSE, MUSE and WOOS.

LOOSE is the opposite of tight. It rhymes with CABOOSE, GOOSE and JUICE. (Who said English spelling isn’t idiosyncratic?)

If you type one of these words, look at it carefully to be certain you have the word you want. That’s called proofreading; don’t just look to see that you spelled the word correctly. Determine that even though it is spelled right it is the word you need.

caboose

caboose (Photo credit: ravensong75)

 

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Death, Where Is Thy Sting?

Death must sting very badly indeed because the word and its associates are so often avoided.  People don’t die, they pass, pass on, pass away, expire (“like a magazine subscription,” in the words of the late—no, dead—George Carlin).  Soldiers aren’t dead, they are fallen.  People lose their spouses. They go to meet their maker, kick the bucket, join the choir invisible. If you want more euphemisms—words that try to make something bad sound more acceptable—go to YouTube and search for Monty Python’s hilarious “Dead Parrot” sketch.

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