Tag Archives: Communication

Different From or Different Than?

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We’ve all wondered about the distinction. (What? You haven’t? Well, just in case….)

DIFFERENT FROM is used when comparing one thing to another: My favorite program is different from yours.

DIFFERENT THAN is used when what follows is a clause with a verb in it: My favorite program is different than what you thought it would be.

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Three Words Often Confused

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                      Daniel on slice #2

These words look quite similar but they serve different purposes:

RESPECTABLY means being worthy of respect or admiration. Misty Copeland, a prima ballerina, performed far more than respectably in “Swan Lake.”

RESPECTFULLY means showing respect or admiration for another. After eating two slices of cake, Daniel respectfully declined a third.

RESPECTIVELY refers to a series of items taken in the order listed. Pat and Corey, a teacher and scientist respectively, first met in college.

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My Feelings Exactly. Literally!

As always, thank you, Brian B.

 

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Don’t Call Me Maiden

When I got married, it was quite unusual for a woman to continue to use the surname she was born into. Even though I became a Birnberg, my husband and I continued to use my original name, Stone, when we made dinner reservations. Otherwise, we’d have to spell Birnberg several times. In fact, when someone asked our daughter, when she was about three, what her name was, she answered, “Joan Rebecca Birnberg BRNBRG.” Obviously, she had heard us spelling our last name repeatedly and, despite omitting the vowels, she thought the spelling was part of her last name.

After my marriage, though, I never referred to Stone as my maiden name. It conjured up a damsel-in-distress to me, so I referred to it as my unmarried name or my birth name. Birth name seems more appropriate to me now because both males and females change their last names for various reasons, whether or not they are or have been married.

Do I wish I had kept my birth name? Yes. If you could only see how our mail has been addressed: BRINBERG, BEINBERG, BIENBERG, BIRENBERG, BRINBAUM and many other creative attempts, including our favorite, BIZENBERRY.

 

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Sic, Sic, Sic

[Sic] is Latin and means so or thus.  It is used, always in brackets (not parentheses), immediately after an error in either speech or writing that is being quoted.  It indicates that the writer who has used that quotation knows that the word immediately before [sic] is an error.  It is used so that you, the reader, will know the error was not made by the writer you are reading but by the writer being quoted. 

Incidentally, [sic] never indicates that any material has been omitted; to show that, you use ellipses (… at the beginning or in the middle of a sentence or …. at the end).

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