Proofread Everything!

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Surely you know how I harangue you to proofread everything. Yes, everything. Are you thinking of getting a tattoo? Tattoos need to be proofread too, preferably before the needle hits your skin. Here are some epic fails I found on the Internet today:

Thenks mather for my life
to live doesn’t mean your alive
Nothing last’s forever
My mom is my angle
God Is A Awesome God
I Love Poo
Living Is The Stronges Drug
No Dream Is To Big
Megan [crossed out] Oops! I Meant “Hollie”
Regret Nohing
Never Don’t Give Up
Stay strong no matter wath happens

Then there is a list of female names, all crossed out: Anna, Rosalie, Jessica, Tina. After those is a new name, Laura. Good luck, Laura.

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2 Comments

Filed under All things having to do with the English language

2 responses to “Proofread Everything!

  1. echo

    Alas, sometimes the problem is that the tattoo owner believes that their tattoo IS spelled correctly.
    I was apalled when i read my daughter’s journal – no, the journal wasn’t horrid, she has lovely thoughts and a flowing language. The problem was that when i mentioned a misspelled word, she told me, ‘We don’t bother with that. Teacher says the most immportant thing is that we organize our thoughts and write them down. Spelling ain’t no big thing.’
    I realize that, when a writer gets to the publishing stage, they have the ‘tools’, like editors and proofreaders and such, plus online spellcheck and dictionaries. Shouldn’t they also have a working knowledge of how to spell?
    Shouldn’t our teachers teach our children how to spell? Or, at least, how to care about correct spelling?
    And don’t even get me started on ‘no more cursive writing.’

    • Echo, I could not agree more. Absolutely, organize your thoughts and write them down. Then edit. Up and down: write it down, fix it up. Shouldn’t editing be part of the process of writing? That was a rhetorical Q. As a part-time calligrapher, I feel strongly about cursive writing. But given the near-ubiquity of machines for writing, I fear for its life.

      I love all the comments you’ve written in response to my blog posts. Am I echoing you or are you echoing me? Either way, we have the same opinions about language. (I just heard a radio announcer say, “And et cetera.” I have a friend who says, “And plus.” My tongue is in shreds.)

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