Shouldn’t the New York Times Know Better?

 

English: Costa Concordia Polski: Statek pasaże...

English: Costa Concordia Polski: Statek pasażerski Costa Concordia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Operations began today to try to turn the wrecked Costa Concordia upright. In reporting this event, the New York Times published this sentence:

 

“On Monday, a salvage crew used pulleys, strand jacks and steel cables, placed on nine caissons attached to the left side of the ship, to slowly dislodge it from the two rocks where it has been laying.”

 

Where it has been laying? I thought the Concordia was a ship, not a hen. “To lay” means to put or place. “To lie” means to rest or recline. The Concordia has been lying on two rocks.  Arrrrrrgh!

 

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2 Comments

Filed under All things having to do with the English language

2 responses to “Shouldn’t the New York Times Know Better?

  1. seagreenpress

    Lay, lie is one of my long-time pet peeves: we learned that in English class an eon ago, so why can’t native speakers get it into their heads?? Good going, Judi!

    Cami

    e-mail: green1802@msn.com

    Date: Mon, 16 Sep 2013 20:45:40 +0000
    To: green1802@msn.com

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